Pentagon Presents China As Military Threat As It Surrounds It

Pentagon's distortion on China's military

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Washington’ s report was released one day after it was reported that China became the world’s second largest economy. Whether the timing is a coincidence or not, China’s military growth is matching the increase of its economic power. The Pentagon, facing budget pressures due to the economic downturn, naturally wants to keep China as a lasting military threat.

The US continues to flex its military muscle by surrounding China with its military bases, engaging in a war in neighboring Afghanistan, and continuing to sell weapons to Taiwan.

The Pentagon’s annual report on the strength of China’s military 2010 contained very little surprising material.

Other than limited credit given to the Chinese military’s overseas peacekeeping efforts and humanitarian assistance, the annual report is making vague accusations over China’s military power, growth and intentions.

The report calls for sustained and reliable US-China military-to-military relations. Yet, given the recent US military activities surrounding China’s Yellow Sea and the South China Sea, including the symbolic presence of the aircraft carrier George Washington, has US military shown willingness to build mutual trust?

The report illustrates the Pentagon’s hostility against the Chinese defense sector. It also sent a confusing message to the world about China’s military role.

Washington’ s report was released one day after it was reported that China became the world’s second largest economy. Whether the timing is a coincidence or not, China’s military growth is matching the increase of its economic power. The Pentagon, facing budget pressures due to the economic downturn, naturally wants to keep China as a lasting military threat.

The US continues to flex its military muscle by surrounding China with its military bases, engaging in a war in neighboring Afghanistan, and continuing to sell weapons to Taiwan.

China bears the burden of realizing sovereign unity and fending off separatists, which is a daunting challenge among other large nations. It is Washington that makes China feel insecure. Neither side wants war, but mistrust between the two will only line the pockets of defense contractors in the US.

Chinese citizens want the same things that most US citizens want. They want a peaceful and stable life. They want a life better for their kids than they had.

Perhaps US officials should look closer at the real situation in China and they would find out the two peoples are not so different.

The Chinese public wants the government to provide them with security, like any other country, and consistent economic growth. Daily life, not confrontation and provocation, tops the agenda of ordinary Chinese.

China is sticking firmly to the principle of peaceful development, but will a war be forced upon China? The question increasingly puzzles the Chinese public.

The Pentagon needs to forget its old mentality and start looking toward a peaceful future.

Articles by: Global Research

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