Why Congress Won’t Agree to Stop Arming Terrorists

The director of the National Security Agency under Ronald ReaganLt. General William Odom said in 2008:

By any measure the US has long used terrorism. In ‘78-79 the Senate was trying to pass a law against international terrorism – in every version they produced, the lawyers said the US would be in violation.

(audio here).

General Odom is absolutely right

And because the U.S. itself uses terrorism, it’s very hesitant to get others in trouble for using terrorism.

And that’s why Congress is refusing to pass a bill agreeing to stop funding terrorists. Specifically, Senator Rand Paul and Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard introduced bills to whose simple name accurately describes what they want:  The “Stop Arming Terrorists Act”.

But neither bill looks like it has any chance of being passed right now:

  • The House bill has only 14 co-sponsors, and was given a mere 6% chance of passing by Skopos Labs
  • The Senate bill has NO co-sponsors, and was given a measly 3% chance of passing by

How pathetic is that?

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Articles by: Washington's Blog

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