War and Terrorism: What’s Behind the Massive Kabul Blast? “ISIS Claimed Responsibility”

Wednesday morning’s powerful blast, believed to have been from explosives in a water-transporting vehicle, killed scores, injuring hundreds more in Kabul, Afghanistan’s heavily protected diplomatic district.

The blast destroyed dozens of vehicles, damaged numerous buildings across a wide area, leaving a huge crater in the ground.

Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid condemned the attack, saying its fighters had nothing to do with it. Kabul’s 1TV channel reported ISIS claiming responsibility for what happened.

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The Taliban’s official spokesman, Zabihullah Mujahid (Source: Daily Pakistan)

It’s unclear how a security breach this great could have happened. Though hard to impossible to check all vehicular and other movements into and around high-security areas, perhaps there’s more to Wednesday’s incident than reported.

America, NATO and their regional rogue state allies support ISIS. Why would it carry out an attack close to where Western and other diplomatic embassies are located, causing enormous carnage, one of the deadliest incidents in the country since US-launched aggression in October 2001?

US Forces Afghanistan (USFOR-A) head General John Nicholson Jr., CENTCOM chief General Joseph Votel, and other Pentagon commanders want more US troops sent to the country.

Trump’s military and national security advisors recommend deploying an additional 50,000 US forces – to prop up Kabul’s pro-Western puppet regime, along with continuing endless war, unwilling to acknowledge a long ago lost cause.

Was Wednesday’s blast a terrorist incident like many others in US war theaters? Or was it something else unknown at this time, perhaps to get Trump to authorize sending thousands more US combat troops to Afghanistan?

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Security forces stand next to a crater created by massive explosion in front of the German Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, May 31, 2017. (Source: ABC News)

Obama continued Bush/Cheney’s war after pledging to end it. Now it’s Trump’s.

Will he continue the futility of the past 16 years, America’s longest war, sending more US forces to pursue a lost cause?

Or will he responsibly end America’s aggression, bringing to a close one of the most disturbing chapters in its history?

In the wake of Wednesday’s blast, along with phony reports about Russia supplying the Taliban with weapons, he’s most likely to escalate America’s longest war, not end it.

Stephen Lendman lives in Chicago. He can be reached at [email protected].

His new book as editor and contributor is titled “Flashpoint in Ukraine: How the US Drive for Hegemony Risks WW III.”

http://www.claritypress.com/LendmanIII.html

Visit his blog site at sjlendman.blogspot.com.

Featured image: abc.net.au


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Articles by: Stephen Lendman

About the author:

Stephen Lendman lives in Chicago. He can be reached at [email protected] His new book as editor and contributor is titled "Flashpoint in Ukraine: US Drive for Hegemony Risks WW III." http://www.claritypress.com/LendmanIII.html Visit his blog site at sjlendman.blogspot.com. Listen to cutting-edge discussions with distinguished guests on the Progressive Radio News Hour on the Progressive Radio Network. It airs three times weekly: live on Sundays at 1PM Central time plus two prerecorded archived programs.

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