Russian Plane Flying “Dangerously Close” to a USS Destroyer in Baltic Sea

The US NAVY has complained that:

“Russian attack jets flew “dangerously close” to a U.S. Navy destroyer numerous times in the Baltic Sea this week, according to U.S. officials, continuing a pattern of behavior in the region that the Defense Department has previously decried.

The incidents occurred Monday and Tuesday, with the planes making multiple passes by the USS Donald Cook, a destroyer, while it was traveling in international waters, U.S. European Command officials said in a statement released Wednesday afternoon. The organization released videos that show the jets roaring by at a high rate of speed, seemingly no more than a few hundred feet away.” (WP, April 13, 2016)

The US destroyer was stationed at the Polish port of  Gdynia, within about 100 km of  Russia’s Kalingrad enclave according to news reports.

Nina Kouprianovo on her Facebook page says:

“There has been lot of complaining today about a Russian plane flying “dangerously close” to a US ship. So I’ve made a helpful diagram just for you.”

The USS Donald Cook, while navigating within international waters has the unspoken mandate to “police” those waters within proximity of Kalingrad, which is an enclave of the Russian Federation. Kalingrad is home to Russia’s Baltic Fleet.

US-NATO routinely conduct war games in the Baltic Sea off the Kalingrad  coastline.

Michel Chossudovsky contributed to this report


Comment on Global Research Articles on our Facebook page

Become a Member of Global Research


Articles by: Global Research News

Disclaimer: The contents of this article are of sole responsibility of the author(s). The Centre for Research on Globalization will not be responsible for any inaccurate or incorrect statement in this article. The Centre of Research on Globalization grants permission to cross-post Global Research articles on community internet sites as long the source and copyright are acknowledged together with a hyperlink to the original Global Research article. For publication of Global Research articles in print or other forms including commercial internet sites, contact: [email protected]

www.globalresearch.ca contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available to our readers under the provisions of "fair use" in an effort to advance a better understanding of political, economic and social issues. The material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving it for research and educational purposes. If you wish to use copyrighted material for purposes other than "fair use" you must request permission from the copyright owner.

For media inquiries: [email protected]earch.ca