Iranian Warships Dock in Sudan

Carnage & Crisis Aversion in the Sudan

The Iranian Navy’s 22nd fleet of warships docked in Port Sudan on Monday.

The Iranian navy flotilla is comprised of Khark warship and Shahid Naqdi Destroyer. Khark has 250 crewmembers and can carry three helicopters.

According to a report by the Navy’s public relations office, the visit is aimed at conveying the message of peace and friendship to the neighboring countries and ensuring security for transportation and shipping against sea piracy.

The report said that the fleet’s commanders are scheduled to hold a meeting with Sudanese Navy commander.

The Iranian Navy has been conducting anti-piracy patrols in the Gulf of Aden since November 2008, when Somali raiders hijacked the Iranian-chartered cargo ship, MV Delight, off the coast of Yemen.

According to UN Security Council resolutions, different countries can send their warships to the Gulf of Aden and coastal waters of Somalia against the pirates and even with prior notice to Somali government enter the territorial waters of that country in pursuit of Somali sea pirates.

The Gulf of Aden – which links the Indian Ocean with the Suez Canal and the Mediterranean Sea – is an important energy corridor, particularly because Persian Gulf oil is shipped to the West through the Suez Canal.


Articles by: Global Research News

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